Hear At Home Mobile Hearing Clinic LTD

Sunday, May 23, 2010

Understanding your Audiogram


The results of a hearing test are recorded on a chart called an audiogram. An audiogram is a graph with red O’s and blue X’s connected with little lines. The O’s represent the right ear and the X’s indicate the left. Marks near the top of the graph are an indication of better hearing while marks further down the graph denote worse hearing. Located across the top or bottom of the audiogram are frequency numbers ranging from 125 Hz, a very low tone, to 8000 Hz, a very high tone.

Along the side the graph a series of decibel (dB) numbers indicate loudness. Very soft sounds are at the top (-10 or 0 dB) and loud sounds (110 db) are located at the bottom. Zero dB does not mean that there is no sound. This level is merely the softest sound a person with normal hearing ability can perceive 50% of the time. A normal conversation usually occurs at about 55 dB on the decibel scale.

Looking at your audiogram you can tell which ear you hear better in, as well as how mild or severe your hearing loss is. You can also determine the frequencies at which you hear best and worst. The word tests will indicate test reliability and/or where in the hearing system you may have problems.

If you have any further questions please call Hear at Home at 778.840.7203

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